The Internet of Things That Eavesdrop and Invade Privacy

A recent decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit shed light on theories plaintiffs will use in privacy litigation against owners of Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices. Already known in the legal blogosphere as “the butt dialing case,” the court’s July 21, 2015 opinion in Huff v. Spaw considered federal […]

Privacy and Connected Cars

Earlier this week I had the pleasure of being a panelist at the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Our topic was “Privacy Issues Unique to Automated Vehicles,” though there was a lot of discussion about all degrees of “connected cars”–not just the “autonomous” kind. To put that topic in context, I surveyed […]

FTC Responds to Questions on Social Media Endorsements

|In 2009, the Federal Trade Commission put the social media world on edge when it released updated Endorsement Guidelines that made it clear that they were watching social media for deceptive and misleading endorsements. Companies doing social media marketing set about experimenting (some successfully, some not) with various ways to convey the required disclosures in as few […]

Is Ascribe the Answer to the Web’s Infringement Problem? [UPDATED]

“The end of piracy?” That’s one of the breathless sub-headers from TNW’s recent article about Ascribe, a German start-up.  Ascribe uses blockchain technology–the same string of software used in Bitcoin crypto-currency–to authenticate works of digital art. Artists submit their works to the service, and receive in return a unique bit of code that identifies the work as belonging […]